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Ghanaian | Cuisines | MyWeku Tastes | Page 2

Cuisine: Ghanaian

Indulgent Oven-baked sea food jollof rice

Oven-baked sea food jollof rice

Arguably the easiest and most convenient way to cook west Africa's iconic jollof rice is to bake it in an oven. On this occasion, instead of the more popular chicken or beef jollof rice, sea food takes centre stage in this recipe. A lobster, king prawns, mussels and clams give this sea food jollof rice a twist that will whet your appetite and nothing gives you that typical coastal West African flavour than this one pot baked dish.

Oven-baked Jollof rice beats jollof rice in a pot!

Oven-Baked Jollof rice

The truth is baked jollof is not traditional, it goes against everything your mum told you about a woman that can cook jollof, it will not impress the men who just love to see their wives in the kitchen for hours but it will certainly save your time. It's like discovering the microwave or frozen meals all over again except this time you actually made it. So if you are like me and your time is precious, try the recipe below and thank me later!


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Ghana's Shito on Toast

Ghana’s Shito on Toast

It is no great surprise that in times when I need a super quick snack shito on toast comes to mind. What could be easier than toasting bread and “buttering” it with some shito?


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Garden egg stew with boiled yam and plantain

Garden egg stew with boiled yam and plantain

Garden egg stew with boiled yam and plantain reminds me of a bygone era in the more forested hinterlands of Ghana. It’s a meal to be had after a hard day’s work on the farm as you scurry back home skipping and dodging puddles of water on the way. In those days, muddy footpaths passed as tarmacs and cement pavements. Squelching chale wote sandals and slippers were the norm and a cutlass in hand to beat the creeping foliage away from the path was a necessity. Leaves danced on the horizon, trees, their bare branches stretched heavenwards like arms held high as they swayed in the wind.

Lady Harriet’s special Domedo

Lady Harriet’s special Domedo

Domedo or “Do-m3-do” as it is correctly pronounced (m3 as in te in tell and do as in the toa in toad) is grilled pork popular as night time street food in Ghana. Like many African recipes there are are numerous variations and styles. This domedo recipe was inspired by domedo I tasted about two years ago and made by my Auntie Harriet.

Ghana's garden egg stew

Ghana’s garden egg stew

Garden egg stew is one of the most popular stews in Ghana. It has the African egg plant commonly known as garden eggs or (known in Ghana as nyadua in the Twi language, s3b3 in Ga, ntrowa in Fanti and Agbitsa in Ewe and solanum aethiopicum in Latin) as its main ingredient.

Suya roast potatoes

Suya roast potatoes

Never mind the fact that these roasted potatoes are arguably healthier. No deep frying pan in sight. These are dusted with West Africa’s suya or chinchinga spice before roasting for that extra flavour. They can be served as part of any meal, although they particularly go with roast or tray baked chicken.


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Fried Rice

Fried rice

No self respecting party in countries like Nigeria, Togo and Ghana goes ahead without the ubiquitous (egg) fried rice. This and other West African twists to the original Chinese fried rice is what this recipe is about. There is no need for Chinese spices, soy sauce or oyster sauce. Instead these are replaced with optional typical West african spices and peppers.

Akla

Akla (Beans Fritters)

As breakfast, street foods and snacks go, koosé or akla is one of my absolute favourite. Growing up in Accra, I thought this was a purely Ghanaian or perhaps more specifically a Hausa breakfast snack until I learned in multi-cultural London that Akla (as my household called it) or koosé (as others, mainly the Hausas in Ghana called it) was somewhat universal.