MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

On the subject of new things, I’ve just received a notification from a blog I subscribe to. It’s an informative blog written by Emmanuel Quartey. Today he announced that he was building a house in Accra and will be documenting the whole process! Good luck bro. You will need it if you want to do things right. My only tip is (again if you want to do things the right way) get started on that building permission. Still waiting for mine on the original plan (which is still very much in play)

Anyway, two of the people I met who had worked with my Dad in building the family home was Mr Mensah a mason and Desmond the building carpenter. Others including an electrician and a plumber. In December my Dad and I had chanced upon a kitchen equipment maker who pretty much happened to have been involved in equipping most of the notable restaurant kitchens in Accra.

All these folks were now needed not to build or stock up the original grand two storey building but to refurbish a 17 ft by 12 ft building. The building had been built a few years ago as an office (in the loft) and a space for a flower shop/business. This “lucky” building had now become pivotal to MyWeku restaurant. In the original plan it was meant to have been pulled down but had now received a new lease of life or perhaps more accurately it had now given my project a new lease of life as the kitchen!
MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure
In the next few days it received the most attention any building had ever received in Accra. It was weighed (not really) and measured. The idea was to turn it into a live kitchen which in normal language refers to an open kitchen where diners can sit a watch the chefs do their thing live! This meant the Windows had to be made as big as was safely possible without compromising on its structural integrity. The electrician was called in to see where all the electrical bits (plugs, wiring, metre etc) could be re-located, the mason to figure out how to open it up but keep the supporting pillars all intact. The carpenter to figure out shelving etc. Even the kitchen equipment guy came in to measure where equipment could be located. Perhaps his was the most invaluable. He suggested an extension to the kitchen which was a little hard to take as it meant we had to sacrifice some of the landscaping area! It was, however, necessary to extend it to increase the kitchen space by about a third.

I left Accra for London after two weeks with the commitment that I’d send the first instalment of funds to get the kitchen started in July.

God being good and faithful and with the first instalment now wired to Accra, the re-fitting of the building began in August 2017. Within a week the kitchen had been gutted.
MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure
A few days later it had all been “dressed.” and the extension to it had also been completed.
MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure

MyWeku Restaurant: The New Kitchen Structure
The plan now was to leave the kitchen structure for now and move on to other areas, notably the structure for the outdoor sitting area. The roofing on the extended kitchen was to be delayed until the seating area structure was also ready to be roofed so we could do both together.



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