We bade goodbye to Mr Mensah and quickly got down to the business of grilling the fish and frying some kelewele and boiled yam to go with it.

An epic trip to Kokrobite beach

An epic trip to Kokrobite beach
What I thought would be a trip to Labadi beach to lounge around and perhaps to reconnect with the township turned into something else. As my guests, James and Matthew and I hailed a taxi from Nmai Dzorn near Adjiriganor in East Legon towards Labadi, the rather interactive taxi driver, Mr Mensah, suggested we head to one of the numerous beaches in Kokrobite instead. As he put it, it was more of a tourist spot and “it was very nice  with a lot of white people”.
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I asked the usual “how much?” To which came the reply 100 GH cedis. Earlier Mr Mensah had agreed on a fee of 35 Gh to Labadi, so it took a couple of brain cells to kick in to realise that Kokrobite was quiet a distance away from Nmai Dzorn.
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Anyway, I haggled and hustled Mr Mensah and managed to beat him down to 70 GH cedis. The trick was to agree to use his taxi from Kokrobite back to Adjiriganor. Even he couldn’t resist a few hours rest on the beach whilst he waited for us.
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The journey to Kokrobite beach was uneventful but informative. We drove through huge Accra neighbourhoods like Abeka Lapaz, Achimota and McCarthy Hills. It took just over an hour to get to Bortianor a small town with its own fine beaches. Bortianor was also the closest town to our destination, Kokrobite. Kokrobite town had its own unique charm. What catches the eye is the mix of old and new. Old houses some perhaps centuries old stood alongside brand new modern town houses.
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Kokrobite is along the Atlantic coast, 30 km (19 miles) to the west of Accra, the capital city of Ghana. It is increasingly becoming the preferred beach for Ghanaians tourists and backpackers. It is, however, mainly known for fishing.
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The local Ga people have a huge presence in the town but, there were also new folks who had emigrated to the area. Mr Mensah’s Ga language skills came into use as he asked the locals which of the best beaches to go to. As it is in friendly Ghana, our car drew a small group of people all keen to help us choose one. My friend James had read in his guide book that he could take a quick lesson in African drumming on one of the beaches. That then became the criteria for choosing a beach until one of the town’s folks who had come round to help mentioned that Mr Armah, the drumming teacher had stopped offering lessons. That then turned the criteria to “the most touristy” of the beaches.
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Without seeing an obvious entry point we were directed to what seemed like a backyard of a house. This apparently served as the entrance to our beach of choice. A couple of minutes of driving slowly, so Mr Mensah’s taxi could take less of a beating on the untarred and wildly contoured dirt road, led to an incredibly charming scene.
An epic trip to Kokrobite beach
Our eyes were wide opened like kids in a candy shop as we drove for another couple minutes. Both sides of the road had an attraction worth gawping at. My favourites was certainly the tree that bore fine African fabric clothes as fruits.
An epic trip to Kokrobite beach
I was also taken in by the decorative walls of a restaurant and guest house which I later learned was owned by Carly and Franco, two Europeans who had been running the restaurant for over a decade. Their little hideaway, descriptively named Kokrobite Garden served as a quick watering hole before heading off to the beach
An epic trip to Kokrobite beach

An epic trip to Kokrobite beach An epic trip to Kokrobite beach An epic trip to Kokrobite beach An epic trip to Kokrobite beach

The beach, Milly’s backyard, was decked out in typical African fashion. The beach bar and the restaurants had beautifully thatched roofs.
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This was a “working” beach with perhaps as many local fishermen busy going about their work as there were tourists.
An epic trip to Kokrobite beach
An epic trip to Kokrobite beach An epic trip to Kokrobite beach An epic trip to Kokrobite beach An epic trip to Kokrobite beach
The water was warm to swim in but what really took my fancy at Milly’s backyard was the work of the local fishermen. I had never experienced or seen the centuries-old traditional way of fishing which predominates along the coast of Ghana. As a Ga speaker it was easy and quick to build rapport with the fishermen who kindly gave me permission to photograph them as they worked and to interview the head fisherman Mr Otchie and his son William Akrofi as they talked me through fishing the traditional Ghana way.
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The day trip to Kokrobite beach ended with the purchase of some of the fish I had watched being brought in. As we drove back to Nmai Dzorn we stopped off in Bortianor to buy some yam and plantain for a feast later on in the evening.
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We bade goodbye to Mr Mensah and quickly got down to the business of grilling the fish and frying some kelewele and boiled yam to go with it.
An epic trip to Kokrobite beach


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